THE STURGEON

This mighty fish, whose prized roe is used to make caviar, is a 300-million-year-old prehistoric animal that survived the dinosaurs. The largest of the species is the Beluga sturgeon (Huso Huso), which can grow twenty feet long, become more than 100 years old and weigh over two tons. Carelian Caviar cultivates the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser Baerii), which produces a caviar called Baerial. The Siberian sturgeon can weigh up to 200 kg and takes between four and six years to produce caviar roe.

HOW TO TELL IF CAVIAR IS GOOD OR BAD

The scent of good caviar is clean and its grains should explode against your tongue. The flavor should be fresh at first taste, growing more complex and rich as the caviar spreads around the mouth. The saltiness should be well integrated in the caviar, with hints of ocean detectable in an aftertaste that also incorporates buttery, nutty flavors. Good caviar does not taste of mud. If you pick up notes of soil or damp basement, your caviar is likely to have been subjected to geosmin (caused by bacteria in hot, muddy water).